Crossroads: Transitional-Aged Youth (TAY) DBT Intensive Outpatient Program

We are pleased to announce the start of the Crossroads Transitional-Aged Youth (TAY) DBT Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP). This program was specifically designed with the developmental stage of young adults between the ages of 18 – 24 in mind. The opening of this program is to support transitional-aged youth with mental health needs presenting during this unique time in their life when they are transitioning to adulthood and forming a sense of self. We are currently accepting calls from transitional-aged youth as we begin to build our first cohort and waitlist. Below is additional information about the program.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a form of therapy created by Marsha Linehan specifically for people who have difficulty tolerating and regulating challenging emotions. These individuals often develop strategies for coping with these intense emotions that help them feel better in the short term but end up causing more suffering in the long term. These individuals often make impulsive, emotionally driven decisions and struggle with self-destructive coping behaviors such as self-injury, suicidal thoughts, substance use and chronic avoidance.

The IOP model is intended for individuals who have tried a less intensive level of therapy and have not achieved the stability they want. It can also be beneficial for individuals demonstrating an escalation of behaviors that could lead to hospitalization or as a step down from an inpatient or residential setting.

DBT can be helpful for individuals who:

  • Have trouble tolerating difficult emotions
  • Have engaged in self-destructive coping behaviors
  • Often make impulsive, emotionally driven decisions
  • Have trouble asking for help effectively
  • Struggle with relationships
  • Are interested and motivated to make positive changes in their lives

IOP can be helpful for individuals who:

  • Have not achieved the level of stability they want
  • Have demonstrated an escalation of behaviors that could lead to hospitalization
  • Are stepping down from inpatient or residential treatment

The Crossroads Transitional-Aged Youth (TAY) DBT Intensive Outpatient Program consists of 3 hours of treatment per day, 3 to 4 days per week.  The IOP meets Tuesday – Friday from 9am – 12pm.  The program provides comprehensive DBT treatment, which includes: individual therapy, supportive/expressive counseling, DBT skills group, psychiatric evaluation/ medication management, and DBT phone coaching.  These therapeutic modalities support the learning, practicing, and generalization of DBT skills.  There is also opportunity to discuss family therapy support as an option as clinically indicated. The IOP is a six to seven-week program for a total of 22-24 treatment days.

For treatment to be most successful, it is critical that the individual is motivated and interested in making positive changes. For this reason, the individual must call the program directly to schedule an intake. Referrals must come directly from the transitional-aged youth. Community providers or family members are welcome to reach out for more information, with questions or to share relevant clinical information.

Program Contact:

Michelle Kaczynski, Licensed Psychologist- Masters

Co-Director, Crossroads Adolescent/ Transitional-Aged Youth (TAY) IOP

45 San Remo Drive
South Burlington, VT 05403

Phone: 802.662.4468

Program Information:

  • Program Type:  Intensive Outpatient
  • Service Types: The IOP includes: individual therapy, supportive/expressive counseling, DBT skills group, psychiatric evaluation/ medication management, DBT phone coaching, clinical evaluation/ recommendations
  • Gender: Any/All
  • Ages: 18-24
  • Length of Stay: 6-7 weeks

Referring Agencies:

  • Self-referral (transitional-aged youth) *
  • Department of Mental Health (DMH)
  • Outpatient Therapists
  • Primary Care Physicians
  • Inpatient Psychiatric Providers
  • Social Workers
  • Case Managers
  • School Counselors

* Referrals must come directly from the transitional-aged youth. Community providers or family members are welcome to reach out for more information, with questions or to share relevant clinical information.